November 11, 2017

5 Historical Spots for Shopping in Manila You Need to Know About

Before SM was born, these places were people’s go-to shopping spots.
SHARE this ARTICLE
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With its presence in every major city in the country, it’s almost hard to imagine life without a nearby SM mall. From being a go-to place of people running personal errands, to making people subconsciously memorize its catchy jingle “We’ve got it all for you”, it’s safe to say that SM malls have become a part of Filipinos’ shopping culture. Hence, for people born in the latter part of the 20th century, it is a wonder how and where people shopped before this well-known shopping center was established in the late 1950s.

Back in the days when SM was not yet born, these were the five places around Manila which defined shopping for Filipinos.


1. Escolta



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Escolta during its glory days (Image: Gerard Lico)


It may not look as glamorous now as today’s business districts, but Escolta in Manila was once the center of business and retail in the country. Tracing its origins as early as the Spanish colonial era, Escolta became a premier commercial district when American businessmen started opening various shopping establishments in the area during the first part of the 20th century. Early players in the scene were Beck’s and Heacock’s Department Store which sold various imported products ranging from radios, typewriters to jewellery, and fashion items while Crystal Arcade and La Estrella del Norte became game-changers by being, respectively, the first shopping mall in Manila and the first retailer to sell a bicycle, automobile, phonograph, and a moving picture machine. Most of the shopping establishments in Escolta have managed to thrive through the years until the place’s decline in the 1960s.


2. Binondo



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Binondo during its early days (Image: Sciello Sciello)


Not far from Escolta is Binondo which was the locals’ alternative for the upscale department stores found in the former. Distinguished as a hub of Chinese merchants which eventually turned the place into Chinatown, Binondo is considered the oldest in the world and the original business district of Manila, dating its commercial activities as early as the pre-colonial period. Vendors here sold affordable products ranging from fashion to grocery items sourced from mainland China until merchants transferred to nearby Divisoria. Today, Binondo is known for jewelries, lucky charms, and the authentic Chinese dishes served in the restaurants found in it.


3. Divisoria



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Divisoria Public Market in the 1920s (Image: Emmanuel Brazil Viray)


Divisoria barely needs an introduction but it is worthy to note that this well-known place has interesting origins. Located northwest of Manila’s Chinatown, Divisoria emerged as a shopping district due to the Spanish government’s prohibition of non-Christian Chinese traders from settling in the walls of Intramuros. These foreign merchants were forced to trade their products in the district of Binondo until commerce gradually flourished in the nearby Divisoria with the opening of the national railway’s former Tutuban Central Station. Through this development, the place became an important market of produce coming from various provinces which launched Divisoria’s popularity.




4. Avenida Rizal



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Avenida Rizal during its heyday and before the construction of LRT Line 1 (Image: Arnel Meily)


Another alternative to the luxurious department stores found in the street of Escolta is the stretch of Avenida Rizal, mostly known as Rizal Avenue today. A main thoroughfare which was considered as the EDSA of the pre and post-World War II, this 6.5-kilometer road used to be a bustling commercial district dotted with movie theaters, stores, and dining spots. At the corner of Avenida and Bustos Streets stood Good Earth Emporium, a department store which featured the first escalators in the country. C.O.D. Department Store was also found in the place before eventually transferring to its well-known home in Cubao. Avenida’s decline started in the 1980s when LRT Line 1 was constructed, literally casting darkness on the road and causing the place to lose its glamor.


5. Quiapo



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Quiapo’s Quezon Boulevard in the 1950s (Image: Lahat 1900s Facebook Page)


Completing the retail scene in downtown Manila is the district of Quiapo which was once known as the country’s center of commerce. Dating its origins as early as the Spanish regime, this well-known place attributes its popularity with the miraculous statue of the Black Nazarene which is housed in Quiapo Church. The latter paved way for businessmen to successfully operate shopping and entertainment establishments in the area which mainly attracted the social elites. However, sharing the same fate with Avenida Rizal, Quiapo’s decline started in the 80s when LRT Line 1 was constructed. Nevertheless, commerce is still alive in the area up to this day with the existence of different stores found in Lacson Underpass, bridge of Quiapo, Carriedo, and Plaza Miranda.




BONUS!


Acme Super Market



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Acme Super Market is the country’s first modern grocery (Images: Philippine History and Architecture)


Long before the emergence of today’s big supermarkets, Filipinos and Americans staying in the city had the pleasure of enjoying foods from the US, Europe, and Australia without leaving the country through Acme Super Market. Established in the late 1940s, this grocery found between the streets of Mabini and M.H. del Pilar in Ermita, Manila was the go-to place of people looking for imported goods such as chocolates, gums, potato chips, and comics. Due to its success, Acme later on opened another branch in the upscale residential area of Forbes Park to cater to the people living in the place. However, both of these two branches ceased their operations when bigger supermarkets emerged during the latter part of the 20th century.




A combination of the Spanish and American influences is the best description one can use to describe the retail scene in Manila before the dominance of SM malls. They are evidently different from the big shopping malls we know today, but are still relatively important to the culture which the people have developed through the years.


Have you experienced shopping in these places today? Share your experience below.

Andrea Aviado

Andrea is a film and design buff who also enjoys writing, traveling, taking pictures and editing photos and videos. She likes discovering new things on one hand while learning stories of the past on the other.

Andrea Aviado

Andrea is a film and design buff who also enjoys writing, traveling, taking pictures and editing photos and videos. She likes discovering new things on one hand while learning stories of the past on the other.

Disclaimer: All articles in the Consumers Magazine of ShoppersGuide.com.ph (SG) are for general information and entertainment purposes only. Although careful research has been made in writing them, SG does not make any warranty about the completeness and accuracy of all information presented in our articles. Our content is not intended to be used in place of legal, medical, or any professional advice.

Sending feedback. Please wait...

Your comment has been sent.

Your comment is important to us. ShoppersGuide is now notified and will review the comment you sent.

An error has occurred!

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November 11, 2017

5 Historical Spots for Shopping in Manila You Need to Know About

Before SM was born, these places were people’s go-to shopping spots.


With its presence in every major city in the country, it’s almost hard to imagine life without a nearby SM mall. From being a go-to place of people running personal errands, to making people subconsciously memorize its catchy jingle “We’ve got it all for you”, it’s safe to say that SM malls have become a part of Filipinos’ shopping culture. Hence, for people born in the latter part of the 20th century, it is a wonder how and where people shopped before this well-known shopping center was established in the late 1950s.

Back in the days when SM was not yet born, these were the five places around Manila which defined shopping for Filipinos.


1. Escolta



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Escolta during its glory days (Image: Gerard Lico)


It may not look as glamorous now as today’s business districts, but Escolta in Manila was once the center of business and retail in the country. Tracing its origins as early as the Spanish colonial era, Escolta became a premier commercial district when American businessmen started opening various shopping establishments in the area during the first part of the 20th century. Early players in the scene were Beck’s and Heacock’s Department Store which sold various imported products ranging from radios, typewriters to jewellery, and fashion items while Crystal Arcade and La Estrella del Norte became game-changers by being, respectively, the first shopping mall in Manila and the first retailer to sell a bicycle, automobile, phonograph, and a moving picture machine. Most of the shopping establishments in Escolta have managed to thrive through the years until the place’s decline in the 1960s.


2. Binondo



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Binondo during its early days (Image: Sciello Sciello)


Not far from Escolta is Binondo which was the locals’ alternative for the upscale department stores found in the former. Distinguished as a hub of Chinese merchants which eventually turned the place into Chinatown, Binondo is considered the oldest in the world and the original business district of Manila, dating its commercial activities as early as the pre-colonial period. Vendors here sold affordable products ranging from fashion to grocery items sourced from mainland China until merchants transferred to nearby Divisoria. Today, Binondo is known for jewelries, lucky charms, and the authentic Chinese dishes served in the restaurants found in it.


3. Divisoria



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Divisoria Public Market in the 1920s (Image: Emmanuel Brazil Viray)


Divisoria barely needs an introduction but it is worthy to note that this well-known place has interesting origins. Located northwest of Manila’s Chinatown, Divisoria emerged as a shopping district due to the Spanish government’s prohibition of non-Christian Chinese traders from settling in the walls of Intramuros. These foreign merchants were forced to trade their products in the district of Binondo until commerce gradually flourished in the nearby Divisoria with the opening of the national railway’s former Tutuban Central Station. Through this development, the place became an important market of produce coming from various provinces which launched Divisoria’s popularity.




4. Avenida Rizal



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Avenida Rizal during its heyday and before the construction of LRT Line 1 (Image: Arnel Meily)


Another alternative to the luxurious department stores found in the street of Escolta is the stretch of Avenida Rizal, mostly known as Rizal Avenue today. A main thoroughfare which was considered as the EDSA of the pre and post-World War II, this 6.5-kilometer road used to be a bustling commercial district dotted with movie theaters, stores, and dining spots. At the corner of Avenida and Bustos Streets stood Good Earth Emporium, a department store which featured the first escalators in the country. C.O.D. Department Store was also found in the place before eventually transferring to its well-known home in Cubao. Avenida’s decline started in the 1980s when LRT Line 1 was constructed, literally casting darkness on the road and causing the place to lose its glamor.


5. Quiapo



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Quiapo’s Quezon Boulevard in the 1950s (Image: Lahat 1900s Facebook Page)


Completing the retail scene in downtown Manila is the district of Quiapo which was once known as the country’s center of commerce. Dating its origins as early as the Spanish regime, this well-known place attributes its popularity with the miraculous statue of the Black Nazarene which is housed in Quiapo Church. The latter paved way for businessmen to successfully operate shopping and entertainment establishments in the area which mainly attracted the social elites. However, sharing the same fate with Avenida Rizal, Quiapo’s decline started in the 80s when LRT Line 1 was constructed. Nevertheless, commerce is still alive in the area up to this day with the existence of different stores found in Lacson Underpass, bridge of Quiapo, Carriedo, and Plaza Miranda.




BONUS!


Acme Super Market



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Acme Super Market is the country’s first modern grocery (Images: Philippine History and Architecture)


Long before the emergence of today’s big supermarkets, Filipinos and Americans staying in the city had the pleasure of enjoying foods from the US, Europe, and Australia without leaving the country through Acme Super Market. Established in the late 1940s, this grocery found between the streets of Mabini and M.H. del Pilar in Ermita, Manila was the go-to place of people looking for imported goods such as chocolates, gums, potato chips, and comics. Due to its success, Acme later on opened another branch in the upscale residential area of Forbes Park to cater to the people living in the place. However, both of these two branches ceased their operations when bigger supermarkets emerged during the latter part of the 20th century.




A combination of the Spanish and American influences is the best description one can use to describe the retail scene in Manila before the dominance of SM malls. They are evidently different from the big shopping malls we know today, but are still relatively important to the culture which the people have developed through the years.


Have you experienced shopping in these places today? Share your experience below.

SHARE this ARTICLE
Facebook Twitter Google+

Andrea Aviado

Andrea is a film and design buff who also enjoys writing, traveling, taking pictures and editing photos and videos. She likes discovering new things on one hand while learning stories of the past on the other.

Andrea Aviado

Andrea is a film and design buff who also enjoys writing, traveling, taking pictures and editing photos and videos. She likes discovering new things on one hand while learning stories of the past on the other.

Guide to Exploring Old & New Cubao Stores for the Best Shopping Trip

Disclaimer: All articles in the Consumers Magazine of ShoppersGuide.com.ph (SG) are for general information and entertainment purposes only. Although careful research has been made in writing them, SG does not make any warranty about the completeness and accuracy of all information presented in our articles. Our content is not intended to be used in place of legal, medical, or any professional advice.

Sending feedback. Please wait...

Your comment has been sent.

Your comment is important to us. ShoppersGuide is now notified and will review the comment you sent.

An error has occurred!

Sorry for the inconvenience. ShoppersGuide is currently fixing this.


November 11, 2017

5 Historical Spots for Shopping in Manila You Need to Know About

Before SM was born, these places were people’s go-to shopping spots.
SHARE this ARTICLE
Facebook Twitter Google+


With its presence in every major city in the country, it’s almost hard to imagine life without a nearby SM mall. From being a go-to place of people running personal errands, to making people subconsciously memorize its catchy jingle “We’ve got it all for you”, it’s safe to say that SM malls have become a part of Filipinos’ shopping culture. Hence, for people born in the latter part of the 20th century, it is a wonder how and where people shopped before this well-known shopping center was established in the late 1950s.

Back in the days when SM was not yet born, these were the five places around Manila which defined shopping for Filipinos.


1. Escolta



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Escolta during its glory days (Image: Gerard Lico)


It may not look as glamorous now as today’s business districts, but Escolta in Manila was once the center of business and retail in the country. Tracing its origins as early as the Spanish colonial era, Escolta became a premier commercial district when American businessmen started opening various shopping establishments in the area during the first part of the 20th century. Early players in the scene were Beck’s and Heacock’s Department Store which sold various imported products ranging from radios, typewriters to jewellery, and fashion items while Crystal Arcade and La Estrella del Norte became game-changers by being, respectively, the first shopping mall in Manila and the first retailer to sell a bicycle, automobile, phonograph, and a moving picture machine. Most of the shopping establishments in Escolta have managed to thrive through the years until the place’s decline in the 1960s.


2. Binondo



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Binondo during its early days (Image: Sciello Sciello)


Not far from Escolta is Binondo which was the locals’ alternative for the upscale department stores found in the former. Distinguished as a hub of Chinese merchants which eventually turned the place into Chinatown, Binondo is considered the oldest in the world and the original business district of Manila, dating its commercial activities as early as the pre-colonial period. Vendors here sold affordable products ranging from fashion to grocery items sourced from mainland China until merchants transferred to nearby Divisoria. Today, Binondo is known for jewelries, lucky charms, and the authentic Chinese dishes served in the restaurants found in it.


3. Divisoria



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Divisoria Public Market in the 1920s (Image: Emmanuel Brazil Viray)


Divisoria barely needs an introduction but it is worthy to note that this well-known place has interesting origins. Located northwest of Manila’s Chinatown, Divisoria emerged as a shopping district due to the Spanish government’s prohibition of non-Christian Chinese traders from settling in the walls of Intramuros. These foreign merchants were forced to trade their products in the district of Binondo until commerce gradually flourished in the nearby Divisoria with the opening of the national railway’s former Tutuban Central Station. Through this development, the place became an important market of produce coming from various provinces which launched Divisoria’s popularity.




4. Avenida Rizal



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Avenida Rizal during its heyday and before the construction of LRT Line 1 (Image: Arnel Meily)


Another alternative to the luxurious department stores found in the street of Escolta is the stretch of Avenida Rizal, mostly known as Rizal Avenue today. A main thoroughfare which was considered as the EDSA of the pre and post-World War II, this 6.5-kilometer road used to be a bustling commercial district dotted with movie theaters, stores, and dining spots. At the corner of Avenida and Bustos Streets stood Good Earth Emporium, a department store which featured the first escalators in the country. C.O.D. Department Store was also found in the place before eventually transferring to its well-known home in Cubao. Avenida’s decline started in the 1980s when LRT Line 1 was constructed, literally casting darkness on the road and causing the place to lose its glamor.


5. Quiapo



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Quiapo’s Quezon Boulevard in the 1950s (Image: Lahat 1900s Facebook Page)


Completing the retail scene in downtown Manila is the district of Quiapo which was once known as the country’s center of commerce. Dating its origins as early as the Spanish regime, this well-known place attributes its popularity with the miraculous statue of the Black Nazarene which is housed in Quiapo Church. The latter paved way for businessmen to successfully operate shopping and entertainment establishments in the area which mainly attracted the social elites. However, sharing the same fate with Avenida Rizal, Quiapo’s decline started in the 80s when LRT Line 1 was constructed. Nevertheless, commerce is still alive in the area up to this day with the existence of different stores found in Lacson Underpass, bridge of Quiapo, Carriedo, and Plaza Miranda.




BONUS!


Acme Super Market



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Acme Super Market is the country’s first modern grocery (Images: Philippine History and Architecture)


Long before the emergence of today’s big supermarkets, Filipinos and Americans staying in the city had the pleasure of enjoying foods from the US, Europe, and Australia without leaving the country through Acme Super Market. Established in the late 1940s, this grocery found between the streets of Mabini and M.H. del Pilar in Ermita, Manila was the go-to place of people looking for imported goods such as chocolates, gums, potato chips, and comics. Due to its success, Acme later on opened another branch in the upscale residential area of Forbes Park to cater to the people living in the place. However, both of these two branches ceased their operations when bigger supermarkets emerged during the latter part of the 20th century.




A combination of the Spanish and American influences is the best description one can use to describe the retail scene in Manila before the dominance of SM malls. They are evidently different from the big shopping malls we know today, but are still relatively important to the culture which the people have developed through the years.


Have you experienced shopping in these places today? Share your experience below.

Andrea Aviado

Andrea is a film and design buff who also enjoys writing, traveling, taking pictures and editing photos and videos. She likes discovering new things on one hand while learning stories of the past on the other.

Andrea Aviado

Andrea is a film and design buff who also enjoys writing, traveling, taking pictures and editing photos and videos. She likes discovering new things on one hand while learning stories of the past on the other.

Disclaimer: All articles in the Consumers Magazine of ShoppersGuide.com.ph (SG) are for general information and entertainment purposes only. Although careful research has been made in writing them, SG does not make any warranty about the completeness and accuracy of all information presented in our articles. Our content is not intended to be used in place of legal, medical, or any professional advice.

Sending feedback. Please wait...

Your comment has been sent.

Your comment is important to us. ShoppersGuide is now notified and will review the comment you sent.

An error has occurred!

Sorry for the inconvenience. ShoppersGuide is currently fixing this.

November 11, 2017

5 Historical Spots for Shopping in Manila You Need to Know About

Before SM was born, these places were people’s go-to shopping spots.


With its presence in every major city in the country, it’s almost hard to imagine life without a nearby SM mall. From being a go-to place of people running personal errands, to making people subconsciously memorize its catchy jingle “We’ve got it all for you”, it’s safe to say that SM malls have become a part of Filipinos’ shopping culture. Hence, for people born in the latter part of the 20th century, it is a wonder how and where people shopped before this well-known shopping center was established in the late 1950s.

Back in the days when SM was not yet born, these were the five places around Manila which defined shopping for Filipinos.


1. Escolta



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Escolta during its glory days (Image: Gerard Lico)


It may not look as glamorous now as today’s business districts, but Escolta in Manila was once the center of business and retail in the country. Tracing its origins as early as the Spanish colonial era, Escolta became a premier commercial district when American businessmen started opening various shopping establishments in the area during the first part of the 20th century. Early players in the scene were Beck’s and Heacock’s Department Store which sold various imported products ranging from radios, typewriters to jewellery, and fashion items while Crystal Arcade and La Estrella del Norte became game-changers by being, respectively, the first shopping mall in Manila and the first retailer to sell a bicycle, automobile, phonograph, and a moving picture machine. Most of the shopping establishments in Escolta have managed to thrive through the years until the place’s decline in the 1960s.


2. Binondo



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Binondo during its early days (Image: Sciello Sciello)


Not far from Escolta is Binondo which was the locals’ alternative for the upscale department stores found in the former. Distinguished as a hub of Chinese merchants which eventually turned the place into Chinatown, Binondo is considered the oldest in the world and the original business district of Manila, dating its commercial activities as early as the pre-colonial period. Vendors here sold affordable products ranging from fashion to grocery items sourced from mainland China until merchants transferred to nearby Divisoria. Today, Binondo is known for jewelries, lucky charms, and the authentic Chinese dishes served in the restaurants found in it.


3. Divisoria



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Divisoria Public Market in the 1920s (Image: Emmanuel Brazil Viray)


Divisoria barely needs an introduction but it is worthy to note that this well-known place has interesting origins. Located northwest of Manila’s Chinatown, Divisoria emerged as a shopping district due to the Spanish government’s prohibition of non-Christian Chinese traders from settling in the walls of Intramuros. These foreign merchants were forced to trade their products in the district of Binondo until commerce gradually flourished in the nearby Divisoria with the opening of the national railway’s former Tutuban Central Station. Through this development, the place became an important market of produce coming from various provinces which launched Divisoria’s popularity.




4. Avenida Rizal



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Avenida Rizal during its heyday and before the construction of LRT Line 1 (Image: Arnel Meily)


Another alternative to the luxurious department stores found in the street of Escolta is the stretch of Avenida Rizal, mostly known as Rizal Avenue today. A main thoroughfare which was considered as the EDSA of the pre and post-World War II, this 6.5-kilometer road used to be a bustling commercial district dotted with movie theaters, stores, and dining spots. At the corner of Avenida and Bustos Streets stood Good Earth Emporium, a department store which featured the first escalators in the country. C.O.D. Department Store was also found in the place before eventually transferring to its well-known home in Cubao. Avenida’s decline started in the 1980s when LRT Line 1 was constructed, literally casting darkness on the road and causing the place to lose its glamor.


5. Quiapo



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Quiapo’s Quezon Boulevard in the 1950s (Image: Lahat 1900s Facebook Page)


Completing the retail scene in downtown Manila is the district of Quiapo which was once known as the country’s center of commerce. Dating its origins as early as the Spanish regime, this well-known place attributes its popularity with the miraculous statue of the Black Nazarene which is housed in Quiapo Church. The latter paved way for businessmen to successfully operate shopping and entertainment establishments in the area which mainly attracted the social elites. However, sharing the same fate with Avenida Rizal, Quiapo’s decline started in the 80s when LRT Line 1 was constructed. Nevertheless, commerce is still alive in the area up to this day with the existence of different stores found in Lacson Underpass, bridge of Quiapo, Carriedo, and Plaza Miranda.




BONUS!


Acme Super Market



history of Escolta, Divisoria, Binondo, Quiapo

Acme Super Market is the country’s first modern grocery (Images: Philippine History and Architecture)


Long before the emergence of today’s big supermarkets, Filipinos and Americans staying in the city had the pleasure of enjoying foods from the US, Europe, and Australia without leaving the country through Acme Super Market. Established in the late 1940s, this grocery found between the streets of Mabini and M.H. del Pilar in Ermita, Manila was the go-to place of people looking for imported goods such as chocolates, gums, potato chips, and comics. Due to its success, Acme later on opened another branch in the upscale residential area of Forbes Park to cater to the people living in the place. However, both of these two branches ceased their operations when bigger supermarkets emerged during the latter part of the 20th century.




A combination of the Spanish and American influences is the best description one can use to describe the retail scene in Manila before the dominance of SM malls. They are evidently different from the big shopping malls we know today, but are still relatively important to the culture which the people have developed through the years.


Have you experienced shopping in these places today? Share your experience below.

SHARE this ARTICLE
Facebook Twitter Google+

Andrea Aviado

Andrea is a film and design buff who also enjoys writing, traveling, taking pictures and editing photos and videos. She likes discovering new things on one hand while learning stories of the past on the other.

Andrea Aviado

Andrea is a film and design buff who also enjoys writing, traveling, taking pictures and editing photos and videos. She likes discovering new things on one hand while learning stories of the past on the other.

Guide to Exploring Old & New Cubao Stores for the Best Shopping Trip

Disclaimer: All articles in the Consumers Magazine of ShoppersGuide.com.ph (SG) are for general information and entertainment purposes only. Although careful research has been made in writing them, SG does not make any warranty about the completeness and accuracy of all information presented in our articles. Our content is not intended to be used in place of legal, medical, or any professional advice.

Sending feedback. Please wait...

Your comment has been sent.

Your comment is important to us. ShoppersGuide is now notified and will review the comment you sent.

An error has occurred!

Sorry for the inconvenience. ShoppersGuide is currently fixing this.


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